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How to Manage Your Back Pain

Back pain is a normal part of being human.  Around 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point in their life, and those same people will typically get better without needing any medical intervention.  You should seek the advice of a healthcare professional if your pain has persisted for more than 3-4 weeks, your symptoms are getting worse and more debilitating, or you have noticed any of the following: change in your bowel/bladder abilities, fever and chills, unexplained weight loss, persistent weakness or numbness and tingling in your legs, or weakness in your foot or ankle.

What is the best way to manage your back pain?

1. Know that having some back pain occasionally is normal and it does not mean that you are broken and need to be fixed.

2. Remain as active as your body will allow you to be. Some motions may be irritating but try not to completely rest as your tissues need blood flow to keep them happy and your nervous system needs positive feedback about movement in general.  Movement is medicine!

3. Know that the best posture is a posture that constantly changes throughout the day. If you sit in the same exact position (even if it is consistent with the internet’s “perfect posture”) you will get stiffness and potentially pain.  Keep moving!

4. Seek the advice of a physical therapist for ideas on movements and exercises you can perform. Make sure the physical therapist is up to date with the most current pain neuroscience and will give you the time and attention to listen and assess what you need as an individual to address your pain.

If you are experiencing low back pain and would like some direction on how to manage it, call Omaha Physical Therapy Institute!  We can help!  402-934-8688

Your Comeback Story Starts Here!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17445733/